9 Simple & Effective Real Estate Email Marketing Strategies For 2022

9 Simple & Effective Real Estate Email Marketing Strategies For 2022

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Given that only 19.7 percent of emails sent by realtors are opened, it's clear that we need to improve our email marketing. Part of the problem is that many agents still follow outdated advice and send emails to too many people that are too long and too frequent.
Fortunately, there are simple ways to improve your email game. If you want to send emails that convert, grab a cup of coffee and read our nine simple and actionable real estate email marketing tips.

 

1. Create & Automate Unresponsive Lead Follow-Up Email Drips

Instead of channeling their inner Hemingway every time they want to follow up with a lead, smart agents write and automate their follow-up emails. Beverly Ruffner, a real estate coach, and Close contributor created a series of six emails that she sends to leads with bad phone numbers. When she receives a bad phone number, she uses her customer relationship manager (CRM) to send these emails automatically until she receives a response.

 

The first two emails in Beverly's follow-up series for leads with bad phone numbers are as follows:

Send Right Away

Subject: Oops, I think we made a mistake!

Good day, [First Name],
I'm just checking in once more. Is your phone number [CELLPHONE] correct?
We wanted to double-check your property search and the area you're looking in. Do you intend to purchase a home?
[First Name of Agent] [Last Name of Agent] [Website]

 

Day 1

Subject: What is your favorite place to visit?

Good day, [First Name],
I'm just checking in once more. Is your phone number [CELLPHONE] correct?
We wanted to double-check your property search and the area you're looking in. Do you intend to purchase a home?
[First Name of Agent] [Last Name of Agent] [Website]

Check out her article How to Convert Leads With Bad Phone Numbers (+ Email Scripts) to read the rest of her follow-up emails and learn more about converting leads with bad phone numbers.

 

2. In Your Referral Emails, Include A Brief Testimonial

When you send emails asking for referrals, always include a brief testimonial from a previous referral client. This will subtly nudge your former clients to refer you to their friends and family. Yes, they probably already like and trust you, but including a testimonial from another referral will provide them with actual social proof that you will value their referral business.

Sean Moudry, a real estate coach, and Close contributor show how to include a brief testimonial in a referral email:

Subject: Sincerely, Thank You!

I just wanted to express my gratitude!
Did you know that my business relies on client referrals like yours? In fact, referrals accounted for more than 20% of my business last year.
Here's another endorsement from a referral I received.
Smith, Jamie
"Sean assisted me in purchasing my first home for less than $2,000 down." This is less than I would have paid for a deposit and the first month's rent!"
Jamie Smith's
If you know anyone who is interested in buying a home for as little as $2,000 down, please contact me at 555-555-5555.
Cheers,
Sean

 

3. Email Cadence Is Nearly As Important As Email Quality

Many new agents don't realize that the timing of your emails is almost as important as the quality of your emails when it comes to real estate email marketing. This is referred to as "cadence" in marketing. If you want your emails to be effective, you should plan out your email cadence to various leads and former clients.

 

4. Convert Links into Call-To-Action Buttons For Mobile Users

I have fat fingers, just like millions of other people around the world. It's one of the many reasons I'll never be a great guitarist, but it also means I despise it when links in emails are just tiny hyperlinked text. So, unless you're offering me a free house, chances are I'll click links in your emails if they're just text.
This is where the buttons come into play. Buttons are much easier to click, which means that more people will click on them and visit your website. While you're at it, try labeling your buttons with CTAs rather than boring copy like "click here."

 

5. Concentrate Your Newsletter Content On What You Know

Olivia Tormenta, Marketing Director at Manhattan's luxury brokerage Warburg Realty, offers this advice.

What is your added value? Curate your content and theme around your specific expertise, skill set, or interests.

Olivia Tormenta, Warburg Realty's Marketing Director

Take a time-lapse video of redecorating a listing and getting it ready for sale, for example, if you have a special talent for staging. Write about how important staging is in today's market and cite previous case studies that show it helps the home sell faster.
Assume you're more of a number cruncher with a finance audience. In that case, your newsletter could be formatted as a market report, with quarterly research on your city's performance and your forecast of where the market might be heading.
If you're new to real estate and still finding your feet, you could begin with a theme that explores a list of "the best of" a popular neighborhood in your city, covering a different area each time. We all enjoy listicles! You could also focus on hobbies such as food, music, pets, or fitness and find ways to connect them to real estate.
Another intriguing angle is interviews/Q&As with industry professionals. Consider any architects, interior designers, artists, gallery owners, or fashion designers you know who are causing a stir in the real estate industry.

 

6. Create At Least Three Variations Of Each Subject Line

Becky Brooks, Digital Marketing Manager & Email Marketing Specialist at The Close, offers this advice.

Becky Brooks, the Digital Marketing Manager in charge of our 90,000-strong email list, suggests writing at least three different versions of each subject line. Why? Because your subscribers will read the subject lines first. Writing them well requires practice! Becky has some more subject line suggestions:
A subject line's job is to be clickable so that your email is opened. Emojis and other pattern interrupters can help draw attention to your email in a crowded inbox. However, the copy you write is ultimately what will drive you open.

Becky Brooks, The Close's Digital Marketing Manager

"Think like a storyteller and leave your audience wanting more." Strong adjectives can help to make your subject lines more appealing and emotional. In terms of length, 35 characters have long been recommended. However, as more people follow best practices in marketing, they become less likely to make you stand out. To gain attention in people's crowded inboxes, experiment with shorter and longer subject lines."

 

7. Keep Your Emails Short, Sweet, And To The Point

Olivia Tormenta, Marketing Director at Manhattan's luxury brokerage Warburg Realty, offers this advice.

Provide digestible amounts of relevant, interesting information. It should take no more than five minutes to read your newsletter. When it comes to nurturing emails, brevity is even more important. Let's get right to the point!

Beverly Ruffner provides an excellent example of a short, sweet, and relevant email:

Did you receive the text?

Hello there, lead the first name.
Did you get the text we sent you about your house search? Just to make sure, it was sent to the lead phone in case it didn't come through. Is that the best possible number?
We want to be your go-to resource for real estate information. What homes are you most interested in, and how can we assist you?
{agent signature}
{auto login link}

 

8. Don't Make All Content Decisions Based On Analytics

While analytics (performance data from your email marketing software) is critical for success, you should exercise extreme caution when making content decisions based on this data. While making decisions based on data may appear to be a good strategy, it can quickly backfire. This is why:
The issue is the small sample size. Assume you send out a newsletter with a link to a blog post about a new restaurant, and 20% of those who open the email click the link to your post. Given that the average click-through rate for the real estate industry is only 1.77 percent, you may decide you have a winner on your hands and begin sending out more restaurant-related emails.
What if only 50 people read the email in the first place? That means only 10 people visited your post. Making major content decisions based on such small numbers rarely yields positive results.

 

9. Use Visuals

Olivia Tormenta, Marketing Director at Manhattan's luxury brokerage Warburg Realty, offers this advice.

Include images that are visually appealing and relevant to your topic. Unsplash.com and other free stock photo sites are excellent resources for high-quality photography. Services like Mailchimp and Constant Contact provide free newsletter templates as part of your paid membership; use them or hire a freelance designer to help you create something more personalized.

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